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"The worst thing about being a tourist is having other tourists recognize you as a tourist. "

Russell Baker

 
Home arrow More... arrow Bookshelf arrow My India, by Valery Collins
My India, by Valery Collins

my india 002_1.JPGWith many years’ experience as a holiday tour manager, Valery has taken a number of groups to India and has fallen in love with the Indian continent, its friendly people and vibrant history. My India – published on 31 August by Vanguard Press – is her second book, a vivid portrayal of the country as well as a lively account of the joys and frustrations of travelling with others and, in some instances, keeping the peace.

‘Two years ago, I decided to stay in India for three weeks in between two groups I was touring with, so in total I was eight weeks in the country,’ says Valery, whose first book, Spirit of the Dolomites was published in August 2008 by Vanguard, an imprint of Pegasus Elliot Mackenzie ‘It was a chance to explore other areas and to find out more about the various religions they practice there.

‘I had to travel light as my luggage was stolen at Delhi airport but it’s amazing how little you can manage on if you have to. Fortunately the two essentials were in my hand luggage – my laptop and my camera – so I was lucky.’

Liberally sprinkled with the sites, sounds and colours of the sub-continent, My India reveals how Valery ensures that holidaymakers get the most from their time in India whilst achieving a compromise between ardent shoppers and lovers of architecture, serious photographers and happy snappers.
 

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"In 1992 I was invited to join the inaugural flight of Richard Branson's Vintage Airways, an airline operating holiday flights from Orlando to Key West using two restored Douglas DC3 aircraft offering 1940's style service, livery, uniforms and experience—one of their signature moments was the excited announcement from the flight deck that they had just heard on the radio, news of the Japanese surrender in the Pacific. I remember the thing that surprised me most—besides Japan tenaciously holding on for another 50 years—was having to walk steeply uphill to my seat."

Alastair McKenzie, 'What's Changed In 60 years of Civil Aviation?', The Director, Oct 07

 

 

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